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5th World Conference on Women and Sport calls for more female leaders

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5th World Conference on Women and Sport calls for more female leaders

800 delegates from 135 countries unanimously approving “The Los Angeles Declaration”, a series of recommendations aimed at promoting gender equality in sport and using sport as a tool to improve the lives of women.

Background

Last Saturday the 5th World Conference on Women and Sport came to an end. The IOC, recognising that gender equality is a critical component of effective sports administration, co-organised the 5th World Conference on Women and Sport. The event was organised jointly by the IOC, the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) and the Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games. Discussion topics covered a variety of subjects associated with the efforts to strengthen women’s representation in sport leadership positions.
Held every four years, the aim of the World Conference on Women and Sport is to assess the progress made in advancing the cause of gender equality within the Olympic Movement and to define future priority actions to improve and increase the involvement of girls and women in this framework.

Find out more about the World Conference on Women and Sport

Results
The participants called on sports leaders to take a more proactive role in advancing the cause of women in and through sport as the event came to a close in Los Angeles, California, on Saturday.
The delegates unanimously approved “The Los Angeles Declaration”, a series of recommendations aimed at promoting gender equality in sport and using sport as a tool to improve the lives of women around the world.

The Los Angeles Declaration
The declaration focused on two main themes:
- The need to bring more women into management and leadership roles
- The need to increase collaboration and partnerships, especially with UN organisations, to promote gender equality.
IOC President Jacques Rogge assured that “I can pledge and I can promise that we will do what is needed”.
The conference declaration acknowledged that the Olympic Movement’s steady progress towards gender equality on the field of play had not been matched in sports leadership positions. It called for more resources to support women in sports leadership roles and urged sports organisations to follow the IOC’s lead by adopting policies to advance gender equality.

Read the Los Angeles Declaration

Partnership with UN
On the issue of collaboration, conference delegates urged the IOC to build on its work with the United Nations by establishing closer partnerships with UN Women and the UN Committee on the Status of Women. UN Women was established in 2010 to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment.

Read the full story on the IOC website




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Article type

News

Author

Vangelis Alexandrakis

Published

Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - 23:00