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A Shared Measurement Framework for impact and evidence

Copyrights: ConnectSport/Sported

A Shared Measurement Framework for impact and evidence

We need to shout about the amazing work that is being done through sport. To do this, we need to build the evidence, and we need to build it together as a sector.

The physical health benefits of sport are widely understood but can sport really reduce anti-social behaviour or raise employment levels?  Does sport have the power to influence people’s social and emotional capacities or improve community relations? In this article originally produced for Connect Sport Emma Heel, Head of Evidence and Learning at Sported, explains why the Sport for Development sector needs a Shared Measurement Framework.

The questions above illustrate the challenge faced by many organisations who, through the intentional use of sport or physical activity, are working to improve the lives of individuals, communities or society as a whole. Those working in this area know that they are making a difference, and fully believe in the power of sport as the effectual, viable, cost-effective solution it can be – when it’s done well.

But we need to convince others of this. We need to shout about the amazing work that is being done through sport.  To do this, we need to build the evidence, and we need to build it together as a sector.

 

Introducing the Shared Measurement Framework

That was driving force behind the ‘Shared Measurement Framework’, developed by the Sport for Development Coalition (a group of organisations including Comic Relief, StreetGames, Access Sport, Laureus and Sported) and informed by consultation with a number of organisations, academics and industry experts in this space.

The sector needs consistency – a common language when talking about outcomes and a common approach to measurement – whilst still accounting for the reality that different organisations have different priorities. We want to strengthen practice so we need something which enables the sector to engage in meaningful and useful conversations about ‘what works’ to improve programme design and delivery.

Critically, we were able to work closely with Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and Sport England to align our framework with the new Government strategy ‘Sporting Future: A New Strategy for an Active Nation’, released in December 2015. This joined-up approach sends a really strong message to the sector, that Sport for Development (SfD) is being taken seriously and that we are united in our vision and our approach.

 

Building an outcomes-based model

SfD programmes deliver outcomes that can either be intrinsic or extrinsic. For example, a programme can support young people to increase essential and intrinsic elements of their nature (self-esteem, managing emotions, motivation) and also support them to develop certain extrinsic behaviours (play sport, be active and healthy, learn and have a job).

Likewise, SfD programmes deliver outcomes which can either be of interest to the individual or to wider social groups and communities. For example, a programme can change individual emotional skills and behaviours and as a result influence their family lives, communities and wider society.

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[This article has been edited by the Operating Team]

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Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 13:48

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