Mapping of good practices relating to social inclusion of migrants through sport

Publication type

Research and Project Evaluations

Publisher

European Commission

Year

2016

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11/03/2016 - 12:49

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Published

10/28/2016 - 11:25

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Revue Sport et Citoyenneté : Sport et droits de l'Homme

Publication type

Other

Publisher

Sport et Citoyenneté

Year

2016

Revue n°36 dédiée au sujet du sport et des droits de l'Homme.

Sport et Citoyenneté publie sa trente-sixième revue. Dans cette nouvelle édition, de nombreux intervenants de qualité et venant d'horizons différents tels que l'actuel président de la Cour européenne des droits de l'Homme, le ministre slovaque de l'Éducation, la Science, la Recherche et le Sport, le président de l'Institut national des droits de l'Homme (Fondation René Cassin) ou encore des professeurs, avocats, et bien sûr des membres de l'équipe de Sport et Citoyenneté.

Lire la revue en ligne

Toutes les informations supplémentaires sont disponibles sur sportetcitoyennete.com

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10/27/2016 - 15:38

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Copyrights: RDT-Anantapur

Girls’ athletics meet utilised for health education

Rural Development Trust (RDT) and Anantapur Sports Academy (ASA) organises the ‘10th Rural Athletic Meet for Girls’ at Anantapur Sports Village (ASV).

This athletics meet gives the girls an opportunity to meet and interact with more girls from different parts of rural Anantapur and spend a great time over two days participating in sport, cultural activities and more.

Athletics has been used very often as one of the most basic of sports competitions in many schools throughout the country. RDT used it too, to give the girls of rural Anantapur an opportunity to express themselves and come out to participate in the practice of sport.

RDT began its first competition in 2007 and has gradually moved thereon to host its 10th rural athletics meet for girls this year. The two-day affair had all the girls arrive on the evening of 21st October 2016 for the meet. The meet was held on 22-23 October 2016 at ASV.

As many as 310 girls from some of the most remote parts of Anantapur participated in the athletic meet. They represented 31 villages of six regions of Anantapur and came in from the hamlets and villages in and around their representative region. The girls could participate in as many as nine track and field disciplines: 100m, 200m, 400m, 4x100m relay, high and long lumps, shot put, discus and javelin throws.

Apart from the sporting events the girls were also given a basic health check-up. This ran throughout the course of the athletic meet. It was organised to assess young girls for any basic health related issues. This health check-up would eventually make for a great way to educate the girls about personal health and hygiene related issues.

The girls also participated in a cultural evening around a campfire. The cultural evening allowed the girls to get away from the clutches of their regular lifestyle - lifestyle that would normally involve them in the daily household chores and also social seclusion owing to the fact that they are girls, under the guise of their safety.

“The girls were very happy to participate in the athletics. However the cultural evening brought immense joy. These girls seldom get an opportunity to interact with so many individuals. Some due to their remote locations some due to their restrictive environment at home. We are very happy to have been able to give them this opportunity to display their sporting prowess along with an opportunity to mingle with so many other girls” said Mrs. Vishala Ferrer, RDT director of hospitality.

Visit the Anantapur Sports Academy website

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Published

10/27/2016 - 11:49
Copyrights: New Jersey Dare Devils

Beyond Sport Young Ambassador Corrine Eckert

sportanddev.org caught up with Corrine Eckert to learn more about her work with young autistic ice hockey players.

The Beyond Sport Young Ambassador’s programme recognises the work that young people are doing to make sport more inclusive. Through their work with Beyond Sport, these ambassadors are given a platform to share their experiences, connect with other young people in the sector and teach audiences about the importance of sport in their lives.

Corrine Eckert was chosen because of her work with autistic youth. After suffering a concussion that prevented her from playing for her high school ice hockey team, a friend encouraged her to try coaching. Corrine was introduced to the New Jersey Dare Devils, an ice hockey team created by the parents of autistic children. The Dare Devils were formed in 2002 when one parent was searching for a physical outlet for her autistic child. The team now has over 50 participants.

On her first day Corrine was paired with an eight-year-old girl who had never spoken. She explains that sport became their form of communication. Eckert would repeat “skate, skate” while encouraging her to move across the ice. Their connection strengthened through Corrine’s teaching of the sport so much that “skate” was the girl’s first word.

During the interview, Corrine spoke about the different aspects of ice hockey that make it enjoyable and useful for autistic youth. Autism is described as a spectrum that includes a wide list of behaviours related to difficulty in communicating,  forming relationships and grasping abstract concepts.

Corrine explains that autistic youth can seem aggressive due to their difficulty in controlling energy and emotions. Ice hockey gives them an outlet. Interestingly, when given a stick and skates, these participants never use them to act out. Instead, the participants know that they are there to play. The enclosed space of the rink also requires that they work together and in harmony.

The Dare Devil team may not play classic ice hockey, but the parents and Corrine don’t feel this is important. What is vital is that autistic youth are given a chance to benefit from organised sports. They get to be physically active, challenge themselves in new ways and work together. Some of the participants have flourished on the ice and learned to communicate in ways that were previously limited.

Corrine feels that working with the Dare Devils has changed her life in a fundamental way. Her work as a Beyond Sport Young Ambassador has not only introduced her to other young people helping others, but has reinforced her belief in the power of sport to change our lives for the better.

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Published

10/26/2016 - 09:44

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FIFA 2.0 The vision for the future

Publication type

Other

Publisher

FIFA

Year

2016

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A new publication by football's governing body highlights the social responsibility of the sport.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino has unveiled a guiding document for the modernisation of football’s governing body – FIFA 2.0.

Entrenched in this document is recognition of the power of football to engage with people and communities. The document outlines what FIFA recognises as the social responsibility of the sport and the organisation.

Football has a choice; it can be a leader and shape change, or it can be a follower and be shaped by change.

While outlining methods to Grow the Game there is emphasis in doing this through socially acceptable means. This includes environmental and financial sustainability, the protection of workers and human rights of those involved in FIFA activities, and the continued respect for each and every individual involved with football across the world.

FIFA plays an active role in promoting sports as a vehicle for social development, fighting racism and discrimination in all its forms, promoting sustainability at sporting mega-events, and highlighting fair play as a fundamental part of football. ™. For years, the organisation has taken important steps in developing comprehensive sustainability strategies for FIFA World Cup™ events to reduce the financial, environmental, and social stresses placed on local communities by these marquee events.

FIFA 2.0 sets out commitments by the organisation to recognise and demonstrate its social responsibility, and to work with partner organisations and governing bodies to ensure football’s positive role in social change.

Overall, these efforts will reinforce FIFA’s commitment to working with partners to advance goals related to social responsibility.

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10/26/2016 - 00:00

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Maidan Summit 2016, India

Maidan is an initiative to bring together, facilitate and encourage ideas and action in the arena of Sport for Development. Driven by Magic Bus, Maidan is an information-sharing platform where individuals and organisations spell out the ways in which the approach is helping society and its potential as a tool for development.

Date

Tue, 12/13/2016 to Wed, 12/14/2016

Location

University of Mumbai, Kalina Campus
Mumbai Maharashtra
India

What is Maidan Summit 2016?

Maidan -2016 is a 2 days summit on Scalable Innovations to converge education with sustainable livelihoods. Supported by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation, the event will be held on December 13 & 14, 2016 in Mumbai. It aims at promoting collaboration, sharing best practices and learning in the education and livelihood space in the country.

Who can participate?

NGOs, corporate houses, practitioners, Government agencies, academicians, vocational/skilling agencies, funders, CSRsbased entities and other stakeholders.

What is in it for participants?

Opportunity to display, demonstrate models and products for impact and scaling up of education and livelihood interventions. Explore newer debates and answers in Education and Livelihood spaces. Network with funding agencies, corporates, Govt. institutions, academic institutions and NGO

How to participate in Maidan Summit -2016?
Session Demonstrations: Organizations/individuals can choose to demonstrate sessions/activities which reflects their unique methodology/approach.

Kiosks: Individual/organizations can showcase work, achievements and best practices using posters, product displays, demonstrations, and sales.

Panel Discussions: Listen to eminent guest speakers, and interact with other visiting organizations including Government representatives and CSR.

Download the concept note for Maidan Summit 2016 here

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Copyrights: Public Sphere, World Bank blog

Cycologic: The power of women for the power of bicycles in Uganda

A story that connects the dots of cycling, women and Uganda. Prof. Leszek Sibilski narrates.

“She who succeeds in gaining the mastery of the bicycle will gain the mastery of life.” - Susan B. Anthony

In America during the 1890s, the bicycle provided women with unprecedented autonomy of mobility and abolished many old fashions, including corsets, bustles, and long voluminous skirts. Bicycles came to epitomize the quintessential “new woman” of the late 19th Century. She was believed to be college educated, active in sports, interested in pursuing a career, and looking for a marriage based on equality. The image of the “new women” was also almost always portrayed on a bicycle! An 1895 article found in the American Wheelman, mentions suffragist leader, Elizabeth Cady Stanton who predicted: “The bicycle will inspire women with more courage, self-respect, self-reliance….”
 
At a conference I attended on cycling, the coffee break chatter included this intriguing question: “What can be more picturesque than a woman on the bicycle?” After a few moments of loud deliberations none of the cycling scholars were able to come up with a clever enough answer, but the expected answer was very obvious: “TWO women riding bicycles!” What a perfect match for the testimony of women’s rights activist, Susan B. Anthony, who stated: “Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives women a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel… the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood.” 
 
It’s amazing to witness people from different walks of life; different countries or differing religions work together for the social good. Such is the compelling story about five women who indirectly and directly empower each other to advocate for the usage of the bicycle as a means of transport in Uganda’s Capital, Kampala. When the London based staff writer, Maeve Shearlaw of The Guardian, wrote an article in August 2015 titled, "Potholes, sewage and traffic hostility: can Kampala ever be a bike-friendly city?", she was most likely not anticipating that a year later her story would inspire three female students from Sweden’s Red Cross College University in Stockholm. The three were taking a course called "Documentary in the World", as a part of a one-year program focused on global social issues.

After reading the article, Emilia Stålhammar, Elsa Löwdin and Veronica Pålsson, who are from different parts of Sweden, agreed that the Dutch educated urban planner, Amanda Ngabirano, a lecturer at the Makerere University who is also a persistent and persuasive advocate for the implementation of bike lanes in the business district of Kampala, would be the most suitable subject for their documentary.

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Published

10/21/2016 - 13:42
Copyrights: Shafi’i Mohyaddin Abokar

Djiboutian football enters new dawn

A big step is taken in Djibouti as the first official football match is played outside capital.

History has been made in Djibouti after the first ever official football match was played outside the capital with the sports complex of Ali Sabeih region hosting the 35th edition of the Djiboutian Super Cup match.

Current champions, ASAS Djibouti Telecom, which is from Ali Sabeih region, welcomed Dihkil FC rivals to the newly-built facility downing them 6-2 in the match over the weekend to clinch their 3rd biggest football victory in the year.

Djiboutian Football Federation officials and government ministers were amongst thousands of spectators who enjoyed the Super Cup match which was also an inaugural event for the launch of the sports complex of Ali Sabeih, the first of its kind built outside the capital Djibouti.

Djiboutian FA president, Souleiman Hassan Waberi, who talked to the media, said that Djiboutian football has now come of age and that it was a new dawn of development for the people of his country to have official football matches being played in different cities and towns.

“The long-awaited day has arrived. Djibouti is now mature enough, but I am not saying we reached our main target, because a long way is still ahead and I want to ensure that our football is fully developed in the years to come,” the president, Souleiman Hassan Waberi told media.

“So many years in the past, we played our official matches only in the capital, but now things have changed and a new dawn of progress has emerged. I take this opportunity to thank the president of the Republic of Djibouti, his excellence Ismail Omar Guelleh for doing everything in his capacity to help us promote the game throughout the country.”

Secretary of state for youth and sport, Mr. Hassan Mohamed Kamil, said that Djiboutian football has taken a big step forward and more other steps will follow soon.

 “Our football is now fully on track and as a government we are very proud of the football development programs under way in the country” said Mr. Kamil.

Kamil once served as secretary general of the Djiboutian Football federation and has experience for developing the game and sport in general.

Other government officials who watched the Djiboutian Super Cup match included: the minister for labour and the reform of the administration His Excellency Hassan Idriss Samrieh, the minister of the budget, His Excellence Bodeh Ahmed Robleh, the minister of communication in charge of posts and telecommunications, His Excellency Abdi Yusuf Sougueh and delegate to the minister of interior in charge of decentralization, His Excellency Hamadou Mohamed Aramis.

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News

Author

Shafi’i Mohyaddin Abokar

Published

10/21/2016 - 12:35
Beyond Sport 2016
Copyrights: Beyond Sport

Day one of Beyond Sport 2016

The summit began with an afternoon of presentations, panels and discussions on inclusion in sport.

Beyond Sport 2016 kicked off with an intense afternoon of discussions on disability, inclusion and sport. The first speaker, Royal Marine JJ Chalmers, set the tone by describing how his experiences as an Invictus Competitor has changed his life after being wounded in Afghanistan.

The opening panel, 'From Access to Opportunity', discussed the role of business and policy in creating access and opportunities for under-represented groups. Lindsay Games from Sport England shared evidence that disabled people want to engage in sport with their friends and family and not be pushed into special programmes. Freya Levy, professional wheelchair basketballer, provided first-hand insights on what inclusive sport can do. Due to her diagnosis of muscular dystrophy and subsequent loss of movement in her legs, Levy uses a wheelchair to get around. She described the importance of sport as a tool for physiotherapy and socialising. She also very powerfully reminded the audience “it is society that disables me” – access to sports, buildings and amenities is limited to someone using a wheelchair because the infrastructure does not support wheelchair access.

Other presentations and panels covered topics such as the importance of collaboration as demonstrated by the 'Paralympic Legacy, Inclusion and Sports Participation programme'. Their Global Disability Innovation Hub is a knowledge centre and online community dedicated to informing people and providing support to inclusive sport initiatives.

Access through space was the topic of both the breakout sessions and involved a panel with Suzy Christopher from BT (British Telecom), Alex White from the Premier League, and the co-founders of the Shippey Campaign. The panel used the example of autism to illustrate how people with sensory difficulties are often shut out of not only playing sports but also participating as fans. The Shippey Campaign has successfully convinced the Premier League to provide spaces for those with sensory difficulties to watch and participate in matches.

Andy Sellins from the Change Foundation presented their new blind rugby programme as an example of how sport can be adapted so that disabled people can play alongside anyone. This opened the debate on what it means to label people as disabled, living with a disability or disabled by society. As audience members shared the language used in their countries it became evident that these terms hinge upon culture and how society has viewed those who are considered physically or behaviourly different.

The session closed with a panel of Invictus Competitors sharing their stories of leaving the military and finding new ways of being confident through sport. The panelists explained that while they did not have a strong background in education, their military training had given them confidence. Once being discharged due to injury, they lacked confidence in the job market. Through sport, they were able to regain not only a sense of self but relearned how to take risks.

Find more articles about the Beyond Sport Summit 2016

 

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Published

10/19/2016 - 10:34